GDAL/OGR, Python

OLD METHOD: Installing GDAL / OGR for Python on Windows

It is now even easier to install GDAL for Python on Windows – see the new post here: Installing GDAL / OGR for Python on Windows ! Do not use the steps below unless you have issues with the above…

After years of having different GDAL versions on various Windows and Linux setups I have finally found out how to install recent versions of GDAL (and OGR) on Windows; and it is surprisingly easy! You will need administrator rights on your computer.

Note that the following situations may cause issues with installing GDAL for Python:

  • Multiple Python installations. For example: ArcGIS installs a version of Python that is not officially registered with Windows (making it a bit more tricky to install GDAL to it). See step 1 for more information.
  • GDAL may already be installed and required by other software (i.e. PostGIS). See step 7 for information and workarounds.

Overview:


1. Determine your desired Python install and version
2. Get the GDAL core files
3. Get the Python bindings
4. Install GDAL
5. Edit Environment Variables
6. Install Python bindings
7. Issues/workarounds for existing GDAL installations
8. Common issues

1. Determine your desired Python install and version

See the post on Locating Python and adding it to your system Path for information about how to find the Python install you wish to use (you do not need to add it to your system Path to continue with the steps below, but it may be useful).

Once you have figured out which Python you are going to use, open the Python interpreter in your normal way (or double click on its python.exe). It will print version information at the top when it opens, for example: Python 2.7.10 (default, May 23 2015, 09:40:32) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32

The important information is highlighted above: my version is Python 2.7 (the additional .10 is not important) and it is 32 bit.

2. Get the GDAL core files

This site: http://www.gisinternals.com/release.php is where you download GDAL. Scroll down to the bottom of the table and click on the relevant link in the ‘Downloads’ column – the Arch. column either shows if it is 32 (win32) or 64 bit (x64), select the one corresponding to your Python.

From the new page download the GDAL Core file: gdal-[version]-[build]-core.msi (e.g. gdal-111-1800-core.msi)

3. Get the Python Bindings

Fortunately the Python bindings are located right here as well, called GDAL-[gdalVersion.architecture]-py[pythonVersion].[exe/msi] (e.g. GDAL-1.11.1.win32-py2.7.msi), just make sure to download the version matching your installed version of Python.

4. Install GDAL

Simply run the GDAL Core installer downloaded in step 2, and note the install path if you change it.

5. Edit Environmental Variables

WARNING: Don’t make any mistakes here (like deleting things), or your system might not work…

To bring up the Environment Variables dialogue:

  • open Control Panel
  • go into System
  • click on Advanced system settings on the left
  • then click Environment Variables at the bottom

First you need to identify if there will be any conflicts with versions of GDAL that may have been installed previously. We will be modifying two environment variables, one called GDAL_DATA and the other the system Path.

To check for previous GDAL versions:

  1. Scroll down in the System variables pane (at the bottom) and look for a variable called GDAL_DATA
  2. Scroll down further in the System variables pane and find the Path variable, click Edit and copy the contents to a text editor, then carefully search through the content and see if there are any references to GDAL
  3. Check the User variables pane for the same (less likely that things are here, but it is worth checking)

If GDAL_DATA does not exist and there are no references to GDAL in the Path variable, there should be no conflicts and you can proceed with the below. Otherwise check out the information in step 7 before proceeding.

In the System variables pane, scroll the box down, select the Path variable, then go to Edit, hit End to get the cursor at the end, add a semi-colon (;) and then enter the path to your GDAL installation – so, for my installation, I added this:

;C:\Program Files (x86)\GDAL

Be very careful not to insert any additional spaces before or after the path (see comments)!

Click Ok, then click New and enter the following:
Variable name: GDAL_DATA
Variable value is the path to the GDAL data directory – so for me:

C:\Program Files (x86)\GDAL\gdal-data

To test the installation, open up your command prompt (type cmd in the Run dialogue), type ogr2ogr and hit enter. This is one of the programs included with GDAL; if your Path is set correctly it will be accessible from anywhere. If some stuff about usage and options is printed out, GDAL is installed correctly and the Environment variables worked. If it instead says: ‘ogr2ogr’ is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file., there is a problem. First try restarting the computer, if ogr2ogr still doesn’t work check your Environment variables for spelling mistakes or typos.

6. Install Python bindings

Run the Python bindings installer downloaded in step 2. If you have have multiple Python installations or a non-standard setup, make sure to check which Python the installer is installing to.

To test the entire setup, open up the relevant Python prompt and enter:

import ogr

Hit enter, then:

import gdal

If both of these run without printing out anything, you are good to go!

7. Issues/workarounds for existing GDAL installations

If another program has already installed GDAL it might cause problems if you override the Path and GDAL_DATA variables as the library versions may mismatch.

Use information about where the variables point to identify which program installed GDAL, and think carefully about whether you still require it. Ideally you can uninstall the existing version and continue with just one version, if you do this make sure to clean up the Path and GDAL_DATA variables so they point to the correct locations and continue with steps 5 and 6 above. Alternately you might be able to just get the bindings for the version that has already been installed, allowing Python to access that.

If the above are not possible the best solution is to temporarily alter the variables depending on which software is required. Possible ways to do this (none are great for all situations):

  • Go through the process of editing your environment variables, as in step 5, each time you need to use the other program (slow, fiddly)
  • Create a new Windows user account for one or the other and set the corresponding Path and GDAL_DATA as User variables (not System variables) for the given account – these will take precedence over the System variables and point to the correct locations, but only when that user is logged in (i.e. new user might be PythonGDAL, but there would be errors if a user attempted to use Python with GDAL from a different login)
  • The command prompt can temporarily override the system path, which endures as long as that prompt remains open (see below for instructions). This can only be used when Python interpreter/scripts are run from the command prompt.

To temporarily override the system path use the set command. If called with no arguments set will list the current variables, but its normal usage is set [variable]=[path], for example: set path=C:\Program Files (x86)\GDAL. It may be easiest to make this into a batch file which sets both the Path and GDAL_DATA variables, which is run from the command line before opening the interpreter or running scripts (remember these also will have to be done from the same command line, as the variables are lost when the command prompt is closed). To do this: open Notepad, enter the relevant commands, for example (note that you will probably want to put Python on your path as well, for convenience):

set path=C:\Program Files (x86)\GDAL;C:\Python27
set GDAL_DATA=C:\Program Files (x86)\GDAL\gdal-data

Save the file as setPaths.bat and run this within the command prompt before running scripts.

8. Common issues

When trying “import gdal” or “import ogr” the ImportError: DLL load failed: The specified module could not be found. error is most commonly caused by errors when adding GDALs install folder to the system Path variable – go back up to step 5 and triple check everything.

If you have any other problems please read through the comments (below), as they contain some solutions to other issues.

Advertisements

76 thoughts on “OLD METHOD: Installing GDAL / OGR for Python on Windows

  1. Hi!
    Excellent description, I haven’t been able to find anything like your text. Unfortunately something goes wrong when I get to step 5. When trying “from osgeo import gdal” I get the following answer:
    Python 2.7.1 (r271:86832, Nov 27 2010, 17:19:03) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on
    win32
    Type “help”, “copyright”, “credits” or “license” for more information.
    >>> from osgeo import gdal
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    File “”, line 1, in
    File “C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 21, in
    _gdal = swig_import_helper()
    File “C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 17, in swig_impor
    t_helper
    _mod = imp.load_module(‘_gdal’, fp, pathname, description)
    ImportError: DLL load failed: Det gÕr inte att k÷ra %1.
    >>>

    best regards,
    Mathias

    1. Mathias, I don’t know for sure what is causing your error, but if I set my Path variable (the one to the GDAL installation folder) incorrectly I get the same error as you… I notice your Python is 64 bit, if you installed 64 bit GDAL you should have added ;C:\Program Files\GDAL to your Path instead of what I had in the tutorial.

      If that doesn’t work, try posting on this forum/email thing it helped me out once before…

    2. Hey!

      So it looks like loads of people have had the same problem. I found a solution on stack exchange but thought it was worth repeating here:

      “This was caused because my PATH variable has other paths where a same
      named dll was used. If you put the c:\program files\gdal before the
      other paths in PATH, it works fine!”

      Thanks for the awesome instructions!

    3. After running into the same issue I was able to resolve it by adding the GDAL entry at the beginning of the PATH System Variable instead of at its end.

      Thanks for the great instructions. Keep keeping it simple 🙂

  2. Hi again. I did that what you recommended but get the same bad things. BUT, when I start python.exe in the C:\Program Files\GDAL it works. I can run the “from osgeo import gdal” but only when starting python from that path. Wrong setup of paths or something?

    br,
    Mathias

  3. That works fine, and not only from C:\Program Files\GDAL but from other places, too. Which is very confusing… When checking sys.path in python C:\Program Files\GDAL is not included but even when I add it with sys.path.append(“C:\Program Files\GDAL”) it doesn’t work. I wonder if some of the files in C:\Program Files\GDAL should be copied into C:\Python27\lib\site-packages or C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\osgeo ?

    1. For me, sys.path in Python does not contain any of the GDAL paths either – it’s all Python related stuff; but ‘from osgeo import ogr’ does work… Don’t copy those files around, it will just make a giant mess of everything!

      I strongly suspect the problem is with your GDAL_DATA variable – either: it is incorrect; your installation didn’t work properly; or my instructions don’t actually work on 64bit systems!

      To check system environment variables, list them with ‘set’ (without quotes, from the windows command prompt). There will be lots of info, but if you scroll to the middle you can confirm that the GDAL_DATA variable exists and is correct.

      I just tested out installing 64 bit on my machine (Python 3.2 x64) – it worked fine…

      You could also double/triple check you got all the correct installers for your system – the GDAL core and Python bindings were both for the same version of GDAL, and the bindings were for the correct version of Python. Try uninstalling both the bindings and GDAL, download them again and install – making sure to use the ‘typical’ settings. Delete the two GDAL related changes you made to your environment variables, restart your computer, then add them again (double/triple checking the paths are correct, etc.)…

      If none of these things work, I suggest you try a different version of Python or post to the forum I linked to in my first reply (I’ve run out of ideas!).

    2. I have the same problem as you, it’s only work from C:\Program Files\GDAL, at last, I install the GDAL-1.9.1.win-amd64-py2.7 and gdal-19-1600-x64-core, the version is 1.9.1(first I install 1.9.2, but I don’t know why the version 1.9.2 can’t work), it(1.9.1) work fine.

  4. Hi, thanks for your description but I run into the same error message.

    >>> from osgeo import gdal

    Traceback (most recent call last):
    File “”, line 1, in
    from osgeo import gdal
    File “C:\Python26\ArcGIS10.0\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 21, in
    _gdal = swig_import_helper()
    File “C:\Python26\ArcGIS10.0\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 17, in swig_import_helper
    _mod = imp.load_module(‘_gdal’, fp, pathname, description)
    ImportError: DLL load failed: The specified module could not be found.

    But in addition ogr2ogr from command line gives me “‘ogr2ogr’ is not recognized as an internal or external command operable program or batch file.” The strange thing is that “PATH” is definitely set correctly and ogr2ogr runs when I start it from cmd being in the GDAL directory. very strange…

    Moved even GDAL into C:\ thinking that “Program Files” may be an issue, but no success…

    Max

  5. Just wanted to say these are fantastic instructions! I was digging around a bit having some issues trying to install based on instructions from other sites when I stumbled upon your site and started from scratch. Everything worked great. Thank you!

    1. Hey,
      looks like the website is down – not sure why, or if/when it might be back! In the mean time you can possibly use the OSGeo4W installer; it allows you to install a whole lot of GIS stuff, including GDAL/OGR. However, I have had a lot of trouble actually using it (program thinks stuff is installed when it isn’t, or stuff is said to be successfully installed, but then doesn’t work, etc…). Furthermore, the paths and processes you need to follow might be different than what I have said in the above post. I will give it a spin now and see how it works out…

  6. Hello,

    Thank you for your reply and useful info.
    It seems like the site works again, so I’ll try to follow the instructions.

  7. Hi
    I did the following:
    From http://www.gisinternals.com/sdk/
    selected MSVC2010 (Win32) -stable > release-1600-gdal-1-9-mapserver-6-0
    Downloaded the core and the Py bindings for Py27

    Instaled it as per excellant instructions – on a Windows 7 32 bit OS with PYthon2.7

    Did typical install for Gdal_core

    At the test in Py IDE (“from owgeo import gdal”) noticed problem in the __init__.py (for me in C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py )

    Then entered some Print statements to init

    Result is a pathname as provided by the find_module as follows:

    pathname C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\osgeo\_gdal.pyd

    from “_mod = imp.load_module(‘_gdal’, fp, pathname, description) ” the failure to load the DLL is then reported.

    I am new to Python and is sems that the _gdal is to be loaded from the above pathname – or is the _gdal.pyd doing the actual loading?

    Also on checking to find a ‘gdal.dll” only found a “gdal19.dll” and a “gdal16.dll” in the directory where the core gdal installed.

    Please assit – is the pathname and file correct for the “pathname” variable?

    Thank you very much.

    Bernard

    1. Hi Bernard,

      I think your GDAL_DATA install or Environment Variable might be the problem, which is why it cannot locate the .dll file.

      You may have sorted it out already, but if not, try the following:

      1. uninstall all the GDAL/OGR stuff and install it again, watch very carefully for erroneous errors, spaces, etc. in your environment variables.
      2. uninstall all the GDAL/OGR stuff, download the latest versions, and install again.

      You really should not interfere with the provided site-packages (i.e. __init__.py)…

    2. Bernard,

      do you have PyQt4 installed?

      I have had an issue with GDAL and PyQt4 which causes an ImportError to do with a DLL when importing GDAL/OGR. Uninstalling the version of PyQt4 you have installed and replacing it with the version here: http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/#pyqt seems to work for me, tested and verified for Python 2.6 (32bit) and Python 3.2 (64bit).

    1. Thanks Staccy – I reinstalled the package several times and experimented to form simplar short directories so as to avoid errors in the emvironment var. Also downloaded the packages numerous times. No luck.

      Nate that Google Sketchup also installed GDAL (earlier version.) I also removed this and reinstalled with no luck. I did not check to see if any problem in registry.

      So changed to C++. If I have time I shall xperiment with a way to get Python to read the library via own interface and then step it aoo the way to see what is going wrong. Thanks. Bernard

      1. I experienced the same problem. When running python from the folder containing the gdal binaries gdal19.dll and a lot of other dll’s which gdal19 was linked against, I could import gdal, but not from any other location. So I guessed it had to do with the order in which things appeared in my PATH variable. For example I had PyQt4 installed which also contained a libmysql.dll, and the PyQt4-stuff appeared before the gdal-folder in my PATH. So if I changed my PATH so that the gdal-folder appeared first, everything works like it should.
        I dont think it has to do with other gdal environment variables (like GDAL_DATA which is only used by certain drivers and to translate certain reference systems..)

  8. Thank you very much… your advises saved me for sure!!! I was completely confused… you was sooooo helpful!!! Thanks again!!!

  9. Hi

    After a good dose of C++ and qt4 had some time during my vacation to revisit this Python~GDAL issue. Carefull investigated the process – then proceded as follows:

    Uninstalled all Python and GDAL packages. Reinstalled Py3.2 (the exact same installation package previously used.) Continued with GDAL core. Then added the referrence to the GDAL to system path variable (see cmd prompt display below.) Then started the Py3.2 IDE and displayed the “system” path;

    >>> import sys
    >>>print (sys.path)
    [‘C:\\Python32\\Lib\\idlelib’, ‘C:\\Windows\\system32\\python32.zip’, ‘C:\\Python32\\DLLs’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib’, ‘C:\\Python32’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib\\site-packages’]
    >>>

    Then checked the system path variable from Windows command prompt:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600] Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. C:\Users\Genman01>path PATH=C:\Program Files\GDAL\;C:\Program Files\PC Connectivity Solution\;…;c:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\IDE\PrivateAssemblies\ C:\Users\Genman01>path^A >> import sys
    >>> print (sys.path)
    [‘C:\\Python32\\Lib\\idlelib’, ‘C:\\Program Files\\GDAL’, ‘C:\\Windows\\system32\\python32.zip’, ‘C:\\Python32\\DLLs’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib’, ‘C:\\Python32’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib\\site-packages’]
    >>>

    Now installed the python bindings for the particular gdal core.

    Then started the Py3.2 IDE and at last:

    >>> from osgeo import gdal
    >>>

    In general, I noticed that Py can also obtain path information from *.pth (hope I remember this correct) – I was unable to obtain any clear documentation on the use of this files and exactly how info is taken and added to the existing Py sys.path.

    I hope this may be of use to others as well.

    PS: Please note, I’m not very good in programming, actually doing this as I am looking at putting some GIS in place for a foudation I am setting up with aim to further scientific knowledge and care for environment were I live. If any person interested I could sure do with help. Aim to map distribution map of species of all plants and animals in my area. Also would like to get a mocel going for invasive species (mainly plants and ants.) one of other important projects is getting to plant a milion trees 9under the “Plant for the planet” program. Should in next couple of months get a website going for the “Outeniqua Biodiversity Foundation”

    Bernard

  10. Hi

    Sorry for the above, it was mangled due to the “capital 6” special character.

    After a good dose of C++ and qt4 had some time during my vacation to revisit this Python~GDAL issue. Carefull investigated the process – then proceded as follows:

    Uninstalled all Python and GDAL packages. Reinstalled Py3.2 (the exact same installation package previously used.) Continued with GDAL core. Then added the referrence to the GDAL to system path variable (see cmd prompt display below.) Then started the Py3.2 IDE and displayed the “system” path;

    >>> import sys
    >>>print (sys.path)
    [‘C:\\Python32\\Lib\\idlelib’, ‘C:\\Windows\\system32\\python32.zip’, ‘C:\\Python32\\DLLs’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib’, ‘C:\\Python32’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib\\site-packages’]
    >>>

    Then checked the system path variable from Windows command prompt:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600] Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. C:\Users\Genman01>path PATH=C:\Program Files\GDAL\;C:\Program Files\PC Connectivity Solution\;…;c:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\IDE\PrivateAssemblies\ C:… >> import sys
    >>> print (sys.path)
    [‘C:\\Python32\\Lib\\idlelib’, ‘C:\\Program Files\\GDAL’, ‘C:\\Windows\\system32\\python32.zip’, ‘C:\\Python32\\DLLs’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib’, ‘C:\\Python32’, ‘C:\\Python32\\lib\\site-packages’]
    >>>

    Now installed the python bindings for the particular gdal core.

    Then started the Py3.2 IDE and at last:

    >>> from osgeo import gdal
    >>>

    In general, I noticed that Py can also obtain path information from *.pth (hope I remember this correct) – I was unable to obtain any clear documentation on the use of this files and exactly how info is taken and added to the existing Py sys.path.

    I hope this may be of use to others as well.

    PS: Please note, I’m not very good in programming, actually doing this as I am looking at putting some GIS in place for a foudation I am setting up with aim to further scientific knowledge and care for environment were I live. If any person interested I could sure do with help. Aim to map distribution map of species of all plants and animals in my area. Also would like to get a mocel going for invasive species (mainly plants and ants.) one of other important projects is getting to plant a milion trees 9under the “Plant for the planet” program. Should in next couple of months get a website going for the “Outeniqua Biodiversity Foundation”

    Bernard

  11. Hi.

    Your how-to works fine, but I need ogr2ogr with OCI driver.

    ogr2ogr on http://www.gisinternals.com/sdk/ doesn’t have OCI driver compiled.
    Is there version with OCI enabled?

    I also tried to install gdal with OCI from osgeo4w, but this didn’t work for me on Windows_7 x64.
    I just can’t run the ogrinfo.exe – Application was unable to start correctly.

  12. Dear Colleges,

    I am trying to install GDAL for the Python application. I need GDAL since I want to convert some points to raster grid and I have read, it is possible by using GDAL.

    The Python version is 2.7. I have followed your instruction and when I say ogr2ogr it works but when I say ‘from osgeo import gdal’
    I receive the error: DLL load failed. I would be thankful if you kindly help me with it.

    I have checked the environment and it is correct. what would be the problem in your idea?

    1. I don’t think you correctly added the GDAL_DATA environment variable (either you made a mistake with the path, or didn’t name it correctly)…

      Cheers,
      Stacy

  13. Hi,
    I get the following error message when entering from osgeo import ogr

    following the above instructions:

    Traceback (most recent call last):
    File “”, line 1, in
    File “C:\Python27\ArcGIS10.1\lib\site-packages\ogr.py”, line 2, in
    from osgeo.gdal import deprecation_warn
    File “C:\Python27\ArcGIS10.1\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 21, in

    _gdal = swig_import_helper()
    File “C:\Python27\ArcGIS10.1\lib\site-packages\osgeo\__init__.py”, line 17, in
    swig_import_helper
    _mod = imp.load_module(‘_gdal’, fp, pathname, description)
    ImportError: DLL load failed: The specified procedure could not be found.

    Cheers
    James

  14. Thanks for these instructions…overall they are great!

    I’m running into one problem that I know is specific to my computer but I’m not sure how to resolve…any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Everything works fine until Step 5 when I try to install the bindings. I receive an error saying that Python 2.6 must be installed and that it cannot be found in the registry.

    I actually do have Python 2.6.5 installed as part of ArcGIS in the following folder C:\Python26\ArcGIS10.0

    With this version of Python, in this location I have already successfully installed NumPy and SciPy and they both found this version in the registry.

    Is there a work around so that this GDAL install will find the same registry information?

    Thanks!

    Jenna

    1. Try this:

      from the GIS Internals page download the GDAL and Mapserver source (i.e. release-XXX-gdal-X-XX-mapserver-X-X-src.zip) matching the GDAL library you have already installed. Unzip it and navigate into the folder, then you need to open up a command window in this GDAL folder. In Windows XP you can do this by right clicking on the folder, while in newer versions of Windows you need to hold down shift while you right click. Now check you can access your Python install by entering the full path to python.exe, i.e., “C:\Python26\ArcGIS10.0\python.exe” (no quotes), then hitting enter. This ought to open up the interpreter. Type “exit()”, followed by enter, to get back to the command prompt. Now type “C:\Python26\ArcGIS10.0\python.exe setup.py install” and hit enter. This ought to install the bindings to the Python that you called to open the setup file…

      Let me know how you get on!

  15. I also followed the great instructions on installing GDAL. All seemed to work fine. After setting the path and running the test on the command prompt all seemed fine. However, when running from the python interpreter it did not work – reporting that the DLL could not be loaded.

    I then changed the path variable, putting the GDAL path as the first entry (be careful to avoid extra spaces and put the semi-colon in the right place). It now works.

    An extra tip. When testing from a command prompt or other python interpreter be sure to restart the prompt or interpreter program (I use Pythonxy and Spyder) – programs read the environment on starting. Hope this helps avoid the frustration I had!

    1. GDAL requires some other libraries; I think this error can occur when another program has added a different version of a library to the path. Moving GDAL to the start will mean that GDALS library version comes up first, but may cause problems when running the other program!

      I have had this issue with PyQt4.

  16. Thanks for all that advice — I installed exactly the same setup on a second computer, but also had the problem of “ImportError: DLL load failed” and from command prompt “ImportError: Module not found” Moving the path variable in front did not help either.

    It worked after I finally reinstalled Python 2.7 — not sure where this DLL conflict comes from, but maybe a corrupt one in my Python installation? In any case, if you have the same issue, also try reinstalling Python itself

  17. Runtime error
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    File “”, line 1, in
    ImportError: No module named osgeo

    Any advice as to wht i have done wrong mate?

    1. I also append my thanks! After a whole day of trying to install this, I’ve found your site and than about half an hour later it’s ready to go! THANK YOU 🙂

  18. Thank you for the clear steps and examples, it works.

    I had a problem with the PATH (error DLL from importing the module while running a .py script, containing import gdal). I solved it by changing the order in the PATH. (GDLA path placed in front of others).

    1. I have added some more detail to the post to help out with this – it may not always be the best idea to change the path order, if there are other important things going on.

  19. I had the same problem as comment #1 and I solved using this thread in Stack Overflow: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6009506/unable-to-install-python-and-gdal-dll-load-failed

    Basically, it is VERY IMPORTANT, to match the compiler version of Python, the Python binding and the GDAL Core package. In my case, I downloaded version 1600 of Python binding and GDAL core package because they were the latest at this moment (08/2014). However, the compiling version of my Python was 1500.

    Additionally, I confused architectures: My laptop is a 64 bits machine, HOWEVER, my Python version is 32 bits. So I had to find Python binding packages + GDAL core packages for Win 32 bits architecture AND compiling version 1500. Both things.

    Hope this helps! 🙂

    1. Thanks Gin, I have never had an issue with different compiler versions (at the moment my Python is v.1500 and GDAL 1800, working fine). However, getting the correct arichitecture is critical, and I have added some more information about how to determine this to the post.

  20. I have the same error and i tried all stuff that it is mention above but nothing work. I install another realease in my case since i have win8 64bits i install release-1600-x64-gdal-1-11-0-mapserver-6-4-1 which correspond (according to the present date) to te last row of “GDAL and MapServer latest release versions”. It’s a dummy solution i know.. but it was a workaround.

  21. Like many others who posted here, I was getting errors in Python saying the DLL failed to load, and/or the module could not be found, when trying to import gdal. The solution for me, which was also mentioned above by Gin on Aug.26, 2014 was to install the correct Python compiling version. Like Gin, I have a 64-bit computer, but I am running 32-bit version of Python, so I installed 32-bit 1600 compiled version of GDAL with appropriate Python bindings. This combination did not work, so I tried the 32-bit 1500 compiled version of GDAL with appropriate Python bindings and now it works!! YAY!!

    Thanks to Gin for her posting, it helped me and probably others, and thanks to this web page and the GISInternals Support Site for supplying software and know-how for users in need.

  22. I had problems installing the bindings after a colleague found out they were installed on d: drive for some reason. That is why I was getting the traceback import error. It worked after copying the files from D:\Lib\site-packages to C:\Python32\Lib\site-packages.

  23. Your instructions worked fine, however when I try to open a .he5 file with gdal.Open, I get the following error:
    RuntimeError: … not recognised as a supported file format

  24. I thought I’d share my experience. Great instructions by the way! I’m on a Windows 7 64-bit machine, but with 32-bit Python 2.7, so I installed the 32-bit versions of the files in this How To. I was trying all the tests (i.e. ‘ogr2ogr’ and ‘from osgeo import ogr’) in the Windows command prompt. The ogr2ogr worked, from the basic, non-python directory. Then I started Python in CMD (I just typed ‘python’ pressed enter, and it becomes a Python interactive window) and tried the ‘from osgeo import ogr’, it said “No module named osgeo”. Bummer. Then after reading some on the internet, I decided to open up my go to Python editor program, Komodo Edit 9.1. This has an auto-complete/suggestion function and when I typed ‘import’ it then gave a list of all the modules I could import, which included gdal. So I typed ‘import gdal’, clicked run, and nothing happened! This meant it worked. Just to be sure I double checked with the following code and again it appeared to work, as indicated by the text ‘imported GDAL’.

    try:
    import gdal
    print ‘imported GDAL’
    except:
    print ‘NO GDAL!!’

    This is as far as I’ve gotten, but I think I’m good to go now!

    1. David,

      You must have multiple Python installations. One Python is on your system Path (i.e. in your Path environment variable), which is the one that comes up when you enter ‘python’ at the command prompt. However, your bindings are installed to another Python install, which is the one used by Komodo.

  25. Hello to all! Thanks for instructions. My attempts to install on WIN7 64bit finally were successfull with next combination (have no idea why) on different computers:
    python-2.7.8.amd64.msi
    gdal-111-1800-x64-core.msi
    GDAL-1.11.2.win-amd64-py2.7.msi

    with all evironment veriable changes as at top of this site.
    Thank again.
    Alexey.

  26. I prefer 64-bit GDAL, but have to use ArcPy as well, so I have installed 32-bit GDAL as well. This created a problem, because changing values of PATH and GDAL_DATA variables didn’t work, and I couldn’t import OGR and GDAL while working in PyScripter.
    So I created this short script, that adjusts the values and allows me to import 64-bit GDAL, while the default setting is set for 32-bit GDAL. It’s quite simple and I think it’s better, than to manually rewrite values of variables, when you want to use 64-bit GDAL.
    Simply copy the content into your script, adjust paths (I’m using Windows 7), and it should work. See http://pastebin.com/Xi8qfdyp

  27. May I ask a stupid question?

    When I start python it displays:

    Python 2.7.13 | packaged by conda-forge | (default, May 2 2017, 13:28:48) [MSC
    v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32

    Am I correct to disregard the “win32” at the end and only consider the 64?

    (I.e. I clicked on “release-1500-x64-gdal-2-2-1-mapserver-7-0-6” on the website, and then on “gdal-202-1500-x64-core.msi” and “GDAL-2.2.1.win-amd64-py2.7.msi”.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s